Voyager 1, which is moving away from Earth at a rate of almost a million miles a day, is carrying some precious cargo, at least from a human’s perspective. It’s currently 11 billion miles away from us and is transporting the most important messages we have to give: our sounds, our language, our music. It’s known as The Golden Record, and this mixtape will continue to travel long after we lose the capacity to track it.

There is popular lore that novel Leaving Las Vegas was author John O’Brien’s “suicide note,” and that he killed himself upon learning that his book would be made into a movie. The idea of Leaving Las Vegas being a suicide note unintentionally originated with a letter O’Brien’s sister Erin wrote to Nicolas Cage after John O’Brien’s death, and with a New York Times article that claims his father also called the book his suicide note. It’s an poetic idea, but it seems to oversimplify the life and literary ambitions of John O’Brien.

I’m still not really over the death of Amy Winehouse, or James Gandolfini, Philip Seymour Hoffman, or Kurt Cobain, for that matter. People we don’t know die all the time, but when someone we don’t know who created art that touched us in some profound way dies, we mourn them almost as if they were family. It’s like we lost a part of ourselves, and very, very important part. When an artist dies who touched us, we mourn them fiercely… Read more »

Louise Belcher is a force of a little girl. She insidiously smart and unapologetically selfish. She thrives on drama and conflict and manipulating others just to manipulate them. She has affection for her family, mostly her father, but her tender feelings are dormant and have to be forced out by acts of terrible uncomfortableness. Her antics are relentless, ruthless, and just shy of pure evil. And that’s why we love her.

Dylan knew something was terribly wrong with the world in a way she could not fathom. As a child she had just trusted that things would work out and adults would show her the way. Everything had seemed inevitable and settled until then, but that summer she got acquainted with a new curl of doom that started her belly and spread to her fingers and toes and kept a constant white buzz in the back of her head.

On “Big Edie” Beale’s death bed her daughter “Little Edie” asked her if there was anything she wanted to say. According to Little Edie she replied “There’s nothing more to say, it’s all in the film.” Groundbreaking documentary filmmakers The Maysles Brothers presented Big and Little Edie Beale to the world in 1975 with the splendid documentaryGrey Gardens, a film that rivets you where you need to be riveted, if you’ve got the groove for it.