Ken Cosgrove has in his reach the perfect setup for an aspiring author: thanks to his marriage situation, he could take of advantage of all the money and time needed to hammer out his first novel. He only toys with this dream briefly, though, this glimmering life not lived, before going back to tracing the same old circles with his hours, this time fueled by revenge. Is that all there is?

Not only does Comedy Central’s Broad City deal with friendship in a lovely and refreshing way, it tackles human sexuality with honesty and panache. From casual conversations with parents about pegging at a wake, to Ilana’s unrequited crush on her pal Abbi and her own unreturned feelings for her FWB Lincoln, sex and all its complexities isn’t labeled or boxed in. Ilana and Abbi live in a generation that doesn’t need to define itself as straight, bisexual, or queer. It’s… Read more »

The last episode of The Jinx features some of the most gut-searing footage of any documentary, ever. The first fascinating scene was a confrontation over two scrawlings of a misspelled “Beverley Hills.” One was on a letter to Durst’s murdered friend Susan Berman, a letter he had apparently forgotten about. The other was written on a note he had been reminded of before by director Andrew Jarecki, an anonymous envelope sent to the Beverly Hills police informing them of a… Read more »

Everyone has a bit of a misspent youth, to varying degrees. No matter what you do, or what success you do or don’t have, that strange decade between college and your 30s is a confusing time. You think you literally feel opportunities pass by with an agitated prickling. Youth can feel like one of those dreams where you know you have something to run from, but your feet are stuck in sludge. The days collect together imperceptibly, but you can acutely feel the slow glug of a single second. The farce of Broad City captures that absurd time of adult youth in a totally new and refreshing way, and it does so on the back of a genuine friendship, something rare in both life and art.

Aside from a brief hiatus last year, Intervention has been with us for nearly 10 years now. LMN thankfully resurrected the compelling show after it got cut from A & E, and not only are they making new episodes, they are airing mini-marathons of the old ones. Critics of the show complain that it is voyeuristic, and it is, but it seems to be actually helping people on both sides of the screen.

We exist in a world of misty storytelling, covering up the flaws in our system with poetry and exaggerations.

But, what if we didn’t have to rely on such a faulty data storage system? What if everything we saw and heard was recorded from our perspective, through our eyes and ears, making replay possible? “The Entire History of You,” the third episode of the first season (2011) of the impeccably executed British sci-fi series Black Mirror explores a technology implanted in our heads that turns our eyes into cameras and projectors.

A shadow of clowns have been haunting the pop culture landscape of late, with pranksters using social media to render real-time urban myths in Wasco, California, and American Horror Story: Freak Show featuring a dingy, murderous clown locked in a masked sardonic grin of terror. Clowns, whose main function is to amuse and entertain, didn’t always have such horrific baggage, but they have always had a bit of a dark side.
A shadow of clowns have been haunting the pop culture landscape of late, with pranksters using social media to render real-time urban myths in Wasco, California, and American Horror Story: Freak Show featuring a grim clown incarnation nodding to both real life terrors like John Wayne Gacy, and the fiction and mythos of Stephen King’s It and a urban legend about a murderous clown posing as a statue to murder a babysitter. Clowns, whose main function is to amuse and entertain, didn’t always have such horrific baggage, but they have always had a bit of a dark side.