It was Key West, 1940, and Carl Tanzler, (a.k.a. the self-proclaimed Count Carl von Cosel) had a fan club while he stood trial for grave robbing. He received scores of letters and visits from young women championing his undying obsession. They were seduced by his spin on eternal love and mad romance. Some of Carl’s fans were excited by his quest to seize life from the clutches of death with the right formula of elixirs and electricity. All great scientiest are thought to be crazy until they’re proven right, they argued.

“Do you really mean it when you say that?” Rinko asks her boyfriend before they say goodnight. She’s an empathetic, caring girlfriend, but she also has insecurities, flares of jealousy. She can be demanding and stay icy for days if you slight her, but she always forgives as long as you stay attentive. She doesn’t judge.

The events of the new film Room, a screenplay Emma Donoghue adapted from her best-selling 2010 novel of the same name, have echos of the Cleveland kidnappings (which came to light after the book was published) and the Jaycee Dugard case, but the main story that loosely inspired this emotional film happened in Austria.

The baffling events of early 2013 in a fabled L.A. hotel are one of many inspirations for American Horror Story: Hotel, and an upcoming horror film called The Bringing. While the details of the case drove intense speculation about possible paranormal elements to a young woman’s death, the reality is more of lonely despair.

Area 51 is strange for a number of reasons, but one of the most glaring reasons it’s odd is so obvious we often can’t see it. It’s known as a secret, but it’s the opposite. It hasn’t been a secret since the 1950s, and even then it was a bit of a open government secret shrouded in mysterious coverups that have now been blasted apart. Whether you are a believer in alien stories or not, Area 51 has definitely invaded our imaginations to stay.

The first episode of Fargo, Season 2 involves Kirsten Dunst as Peggy Blomquist, a butcher’s wife who lets her denial of reality wrap them both up in a dizzying coverup. Some of the details of this darkly comedic scenario are inspired by a true events from over a decade ago.

“I’m dying for a drink,” Mike Malloy said as she stumbled into Tony Marino’s speakeasy in the Bronx. He looked a little more worn than before. Each murder attempt took a bit out of him, but being hit by a taxi had so far done the most damage. He was still thirsty, though, and the drinks just kept coming.