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We all think we have full autonomy and sovereignty over our thoughts and actions. Sure, we have the hardware of our DNA, we are shaped by our upbringing and experiences, we are inspired by our heroes, and seek figures of wisdom to help us fumble our way through life – We learn from each other, we seek community, we share and grow. But, when it comes down to dire situations, someone couldn’t possibly “wash” our brains clean and fill it with new thoughts that go against our best interests and core values! That’s what it feels like, but psychological experiments like the 1961 Milgram study have proven that we aren’t always in control of our actions when we’re told what to do by an authority figure we trust.

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In 1994-5, Marcia Clark wasn’t just under the immense pressure of the massively scrutinized O. J. Simpson case, she was also a mother going through a divorce. On top of everything, in a trial that was intentionally needling at the depths of the race problem in American, Marcia Clark’s hair really stirred things up as well. Why did Marcia Clark’s hair symbolize so much to us then, and what does it all mean now?

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The Coen brothers’ latest effort, Hail, Caesar, shines not when it’s lambasting showbiz, but when it’s celebrating it. The over-the-top musical numbers are stunning and just as magical as the iconic performances they’re inspired by. These types of displays are the essence of entertainment: an attempt to pull you out of yourself and into a looking glass world that sparkles with song and graceful, effortless movements. They’re dream sequences of the human spirit.

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“Please remember me as Juice,’” – O. J. Simpson, June, 1994 On June 17, 1994, O. J. Simpson was at Robert Kardashian’s house with his lawyers, who thought he was minutes away from turning himself into the police. It was a pre-arranged deal that doesn’t happen very often with murder charges, but these were special circumstances. It’s not every day that a someone as famous and widely beloved as O. J. Simpson is suspected of murdering his ex-wife. “Please remember… Read more »

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Einar Wegener picked the day he was going to kill himself: May 1, 1930. Months before the looming suicide date arrived, however, Einar was given an unbelievable opportunity. He found he could physically transform into Lili with the help of innovative German doctors. The surgeries were risky, but at that point so was continuing life in the world as Einar. The stakes were high all around, and if there was a way to make Einar disappear so Lili could live, he was going to try it.

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The first thing you’ll notice in Aokigahara, the setting and inspiration for the new horror movie The Forest, is the still silence. The foliage here is especially dense, it grows on a bed of nutrient-rich lava from a 10-day 864 Mt. Fuji eruption, and its lush expanse blocks outside sound. There is an uncommon lack of wildlife, so even the rustle of scurrying creatures or trills of a birdsong is rare. Most of the time all that can be heard is the crunch of your own feet.

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The second season of Transparent takes a bold move: through a series of delirious flashbacks we’re introduced to the vibrant life of Maura’s now uncommunicative mother Rose when she was a young girl in 1930s Berlin. The flashbacks start off celebratory, but lead to dark revelations about the family’s traumatic past.

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The concept of “The Force” in Star Wars seems to resonant universally. The idea of the force seems easy enough to understand when you’re in the midst of the delightful intergalactic ride full of non-stop action and satisfying scene wipes, but it gets a bit more nebulous the more you try to grasp it. What is The Force, really? And why do we respond so powerfully to it?